Research &

Social-Emotional Learning

What is Social-Emotional Learning?

According to the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL), Social and emotional learning (SEL) is the process through which children and adults acquire and effectively apply the knowledge, attitudes, and skills necessary to understand and manage emotions, set and achieve positive goals, feel and show empathy for others, establish and maintain positive relationships, and make responsible decisions.

An extensive body of rigorous research demonstrates that education that promotes social and emotional learning (SEL) gets results. The short term results for students include better grades, improved behavior and attitudes, and better attendance. The research goes on to show us that even up to 18 years later, students exposed to SEL in school continue to do better than their peers on a number of indicators: positive social behaviors and attitudes, skills such as empathy and teamwork, and academics. And they have fewer conduct problems, less emotional distress, and lower drug use, among many other benefits (CASEL).

a framework based on research

The Core Project's is founded on the evidence of social-emotional learning and the proven methods of experiential education. Everything we do is based on the research that the best learning happens when young people have supportive adult relationships and the activities or lessons are challenging, engaging and meaningful

 
The Research
social-emotional learning

Schools where SEL competencies are taught have been shown to foster student attachment to school and receptivity to learning, factors which are strongly linked to academic success. (Blum, McNeely and Rinehart, 2002; Osterman, 2000)

SEL can increase the capacity of all students to become “knowledgeable, responsible, caring, productive, nonviolent and contributing members of society.”

(Zins et al., 2001)

Students exposed to SEL in school continue to do better than their peers on a number of indicators: positive social behaviors and attitudes, skills such as empathy and teamwork, and academics. And they have fewer conduct problems, less emotional distress, and lower drug use, among many other benefits. 

(CASEL)

positive school climate

Positive school climate in middle and high school is associated with academic achievement, decreased absenteeism, and lower rates of suspension

(Thapa et al., 2013). 

relationships & connection

At the classroom level the quality of teacher-student interactions is one of the most important predictors of student academic performance and adjustment

(Hamre & Pianta, 2007; Mashburn & Pianta, 2006).

In schools characterized by supportive relationships, common goals and norms, and a sense of collaboration, students perform better academically and have fewer behavior problems.

(Bryk & Schneider, 2002; Payne et al., 2003)

sources

Blum, R. W., McNeely, C. A., & Rinehart, P. M. (2002). Improving the odds: The untapped power of schools to improve the health of teens. Minneapolis: Center for Adolescent Health and Development, University of Minnesota. Retrieved from http://www.sfu.ca/cfrj/fulltext/blum.pdf 

Bryk, A.S. & Schneider, B. (2002). Trust in schools: A core resource for improvement. New York: Russell Sage.

Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning. (2003). Safe and sound: An educational leader’s guide to evidence-based social and emotional learning (SEL) programs. Chicago, IL: Author.

Hamre, B. K., & Pianta, R. C. (2007). Learning opportunities in preschool and early elementary classrooms. In R. Pianta, M. Cox, & K. Snow (Eds.), School readiness & the transition to kindergarten in the era of accountability (pp. 49-84). Baltimore, MD: Brookes.

Thapa, A., Cohen, J., Guffey, S., & Higgins-D’Alessandro, A. (2013). A review of school climate research. Review of Educational Research, 83(3), 357-385.

Zins, J. E., Weissberg, R. P., Wang, M. C., & Walberg, H. J. (Eds.). (2004). Building academic success on social and emotional learning: What does the research say? New York, NY: Teachers College Press.

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